As fog lifts, view’s not encouraging

October 1, 2010

During the roughly six months since the federal takeover of health care was passed, some of the “fog of confusion” so memorably described by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi – whose talent for obfuscation gives new meaning to her hometown’s nickname, the “Fog City” – has indeed lifted, as she predicted.  Unfortunately, the picture that’s forming isn’t reassuring.  Let’s take a look at some specifics:

Has the heath care takeover lowered costs for families and for businesses?

No.  According to a recent Wall Street Journal report, “insurers have asked [state regulators] for premium increases of between 1% and 9% to pay for extra benefits required under the law, according to filings with state regulators. [Insurers] say Congress’s landmark refashioning of U.S. health coverage, which passed in March after a brutal fight, is causing them to pass on more costs to consumers than Democrats predicted.” – “Health Insurers Plan Hikes”, Wall Street Journal, September 8, 2010.

Will the health care takeover improve access to health care for children?

No.  According to the Los Angeles Times, many health insurance companies are dropping child-only policies, “because the new federal requirement could create huge and unexpected costs for covering children.” – “Big health insurers to stop selling new child-only policies”, Los Angeles Times, September 21, 2010.

Will the health care takeover lower health care costs?

No.  In fact, the new health care law will actually increase costs. The Obama Administration’s own Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released a report that stated that the health care bill “will have negligible effects on total national health spending in the next 10 years.” In fact the report went on to say that health care spending will actually increase at a faster rate. – “Health Outlays Still Seen Rising”, Wall Street Journal, September 8, 2010.

(The new government report released by HHS says President Obama’s health care law will have negligible effects on total national health spending in the next 10 years, neither slowing nor fueling the explosive growth of medical costs.)

What seems clear as we learn ever more about the health care takeover is that the very premises for passing the law – to increase access and reduce costs – are not being honored as it begins to take effect.  And this is just the beginning.  America needs a plan that works, and on November 2, your vote for Nan Hayworth will be a step towards achieving that.  The choice, too, is clear.

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If you drive into a wall, don’t blame the wall

August 22, 2010

 
Some observers from the left side of the political spectrum have been bending themselves into pretzels trying to explain why President Obama isn’t making headway with the American public in the midterm election campaign push.  Their efforts would be comical if they didn’t reflect a political philosophy that has cost us so dearly.

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Bad medicine

August 20, 2010

 
In December, 1799, President George Washington contracted a severe throat infection.  His doctors–distinguished experts all–treated him with calomel, to induce vomiting, and bloodletting.  When their patient’s condition deteriorated, they treated even more vigorously, giving more calomel and taking more blood in the hopes that this time they’d succeed.

George Washington died of dehydration, blood loss, and choking from the uncontrolled infection.  His very well-meaning physicians had actually hastened his death.

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For another 75 years and beyond

August 14, 2010

 
Statement by Nan Hayworth on the 75th Anniversary of Social Security

Social Security represents the aspiration within the American character to do right by our neighbors and our fellow citizens.  When Social Security was signed into law 75 years ago, our government was prepared to finance the program responsibly.  Much has changed during the intervening decades to create an ever greater role for Social Security, and that in turn demands that we anticipate future needs so that we can continue this program that is critically important for tens of millions of Americans.

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Signs of denial

July 16, 2010

 
Let’s say you love jelly beans (who doesn’t?), so you use your life savings to open The Bean Counter.  Unfortunately, most of your prospective customers think you’re offering accounting services rather than candy, and the rest are worried about getting cavities, so after a couple of months you have to close up shop; your whole venture down the drain.  Now, what do you do to pick up the pieces?  Well, if you follow the lead of the current Administration, you borrow some more money to pay for an ad campaign to trumpet the success of The Bean Counter!

Huh?

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What happened to the John Hall Standard?

July 14, 2010

 
You may have noticed the first recurring feature on our blog, “John Hall vs. the Constitution” (link to Part I, Part II, and Part III).  As it happens, Mr. Hall provides so much for us to talk about that we’re introducing a second recurring feature, in which we’ll be cataloguing the ways in which he fails to live up to his own criteria for re-election.

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Business ally issues overdue warning to White House

June 23, 2010

 
The Business Roundtable
, a longtime Obama Administration ally, finally announced today what many voters have known for months: President Obama and Nancy Pelosi are creating an “increasingly hostile environment for investment and job creation” that will “harm our ability…to grow private-sector jobs in the US.” 
 
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